• Container ship on Egypt's Suez Canal

    Container ship on Egypt's Suez Canal

  • Turtle hatchlings seeing daylight for the 1st time in Seychelles

    Turtle hatchlings seeing daylight for the 1st time in Seychelles

  • Hole in the wall off South Africa's Wild Coast

    Hole in the wall off South Africa's Wild Coast

  • Ferry boat with cars on the Nile

    Ferry boat with cars on the Nile

  • Hermine Batters Cameroon Coast causing Erosion

    Hermine Batters Cameroon Coast causing Erosion

  • MV Mtafiti Family

    The MV Mtafiti Crew

A new study found that the Indian Ocean's Agulhas Current is getting wider rather than strengthening. The findings, which have important implications for global climate change, suggest that intensifying winds in the region may be increasing the turbulence of the current, rather than increasing its flow rate.

A new study by University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers found that the Indian Ocean's Agulhas Current is getting wider rather than strengthening. The findings, which have important implications for global climate change, suggest that intensifying winds in the region may be increasing the turbulence of the current, rather than increasing its flow rate.

Using measurements collected during three scientific cruises to the Agulhas Current, the Indian Ocean's version of the Gulf Stream, researchers estimated the long-term transport of the current leveraging 22 years of satellite data. They found the Agulhas Current has broadened, not strengthened, since the early 1990s, due to more turbulence from increased eddying and meandering.

More Information

Twitter Feed

Follow us on Facebook