Seabirds are enticed into eating plastic debris because it smells like their food, according to scientists.The study found that drifting plastic waste accumulates algae and gives off a smell very similar to the krill that many marine birds feed on. The findings could explain why certain birds -…

Read more: Seabirds eat floating plastic debris because it smells like food, study finds

When a whale sings, it fills the sea with more than just serene sounds. It also sends vibrations coursing through the water like a speaker with the bass turned way up. Though scientists have long listened to the marine mammals’ melodies, they haven’t really been feeling the music.…

Read more: Whales Can Really Rock With Their Mellow Songs

Phytoplankton are tiny—almost microscopic—but don't let that fool you. These free-floating, plant-like organisms occupy the bottom of the ocean's food chain, making them vital to the ecosystem. They live in the ocean and in sea ice, and like plants on land, phytoplankton need sunlight. Most are buoyant and…

Read more: Species On The Move

From British Columbia to Northern California, planet Earth’s got a case of the toots. A recent deep ocean mapping survey has learned that a geologically-active strip of seafloor called the Cascadia Subduction Zone is bubbling methane like mad. It could be one of the most active methane seeps…

Read more: There's an Enormous Natural Gas Seep Along the West Coast.

The publication on “Case studies on climate change and African coastal fisheries: a vulnerability analysis and recommendations for adaptation options,” is out. The publication was edited by Jim Anderson and Timothy Andrew and produced by the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD)–FAO Fish Programme (NFFP) Component C (FMM/GLO/003/MUL)…

Read more: Case Studies on Climate Change and African Coastal Fisheries: A Vulnerability Analysis and Recommendations for Adaptation Options

The creatures of the Southern Ocean just got a lot more space to roam freely. On Thursday, 24 countries and the European Union agreed to set aside a 600,000-square-mile swath of ocean — roughly twice the size of Texas —  off the coast of Antarctica as a marine…

Read more: World’s New Marine Protected Area is a Big Climate Win