Vladimir Ryabinin, Executive Secretary, IOC-UNESCO
(Photo by IISD/ENB)

The 22nd session of Conference of Parties (COP 22) held in Morocco brought global delegates from different countries and sectors to discuss Global Climate Action. This year’s Ocean Action day was held on 12th November, 2016 had support from UNESCO-IOC…

Read more: UNESCO- IOC LEADS IN COP 22 OCEAN ACTION DAY

The oceans of the Earth can exist without us. If we humans become extinct, they won’t even notice we’re gone. We, however, simply cannot exist without our oceans. We need them. They are the primary life support system on Earth, the lungs, climate regulator, and ultimate food factory — connected…

Read more: We cannot survive without our oceans. We must act to save them — now

Queensland’s environment minister has flagged concerns that the agency tasked with protecting the Great Barrier Reef is running as a “shell of its former self” amid the underfunding of a cornerstone program.Steven Miles called on the federal government to fast-track an extra $1.65m for the main “on-water” management…

Read more: Great Barrier Reef authority a 'shell of its former self', says Queensland minister

England’s bathing waters are the cleanest ever recorded thanks to a dry summer, tighter EU regulations and increased spending by water companies.

Of the 413 beaches monitored up to 20 times a year by the Environment Agency for their pollution, 98.5% passed the minimum EU limit. Of these,…

Read more: Water at England's beaches is cleanest on record

The EU is proposing to spend hundreds of millions of euros to help the budding ocean energy industry to provide a tenth of the bloc’s power by 2050. The boost would take the form of a €250m investment fund, with an additional €70m set aside for insurance, loans…

Read more: EU plans €320m funding boost for budding ocean energy industry

Seabirds are enticed into eating plastic debris because it smells like their food, according to scientists.The study found that drifting plastic waste accumulates algae and gives off a smell very similar to the krill that many marine birds feed on. The findings could explain why certain birds -…

Read more: Seabirds eat floating plastic debris because it smells like food, study finds